News

October 2015: Madeline Trollope speaks at the 6th Pan African TVET and FET College conference

Madeline Trollope was a speaker at the 6th Pan African TVET and FET College conference.

Her presentation was on how  the improvement of teaching and assessment strategies in the Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) sector can  lead to improvement of learning and performance.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The photo is  taken at the  Pan African TVET and FET Colleges Conference in Cape Town with Madeline Trollope; Tholsia Naidoo, Deputy Minister of Education Mduduzi Manana and Mike Naidoo.

The conference theme was: ‘Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Strategies for Improvement’


You can read more about the conference at: http://www.iacafrica.co.za/conferences/item/136-6th-pan-african-tvet-and-fet-colleges-conference

September 2015: Assessment College was part of the Momentum graduation

On 17 September 2015 Assessment College was part of the Momentum graduation when 22 learners received their ODEDTP certificates.

During the function we were reminded of what Oprah Winfrey said: “Education is the key to unlocking the world, a passport to freedom.

Madeline Trollope, the manager of Assessment College quoted Dr Seuss during the ceremony: You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. You are the guy who’ll decide where to go."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


June 2015: Assessment College Conference 2015

The Assessment College conference held on 10 June 2015 at Campbell House in Houghton was a huge success. The topics presented included: 

  • International trends in assessments
  • White Paper for post-school Education and Training
  • Generation X vs Generation Y learning styles
  • How to use social media to make your facilitation more interactive


Assessment College Conference picture

Assessment College Conference picture

Assessment College Conference pictureAssessment College Conference picture

March 2014: Understanding the education spend in the 2014/2015 National Budget

Understanding the education spend in the 2014/2015 National Budget 

In February 2014, Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan announced that 20 percent of government expenditure in the National Budget for 2014/15 will go to education, amounting to R254-billion. Tabling his 2014 Budget in Parliament Gordhan said the money would be used to increase access to schooling and improve infrastructure in the schools. He added that 433 new schools would be built over the next three years. Further, a large chunk of the total education budget will go to provincial education departments to pay teachers' salaries. This is in-line with the Department of Basic Education's long-term plan to improve the quality of education focuses on literacy, numeracy as well as science and languages.

Post-school education and training accounts for about 21% of total education spend for 2014/15, with R21-billion set aside for university subsidies and R19-billion for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), which provides students with bursaries and loans.

Gordhan also stated that despite progress made to date, the number of mathematics and science passes in matric, which is 30 719 and 25 567 respectively, will have to increase dramatically to meet the National Development Plan’s target of 450 000 university entrance passes with these subjects by 2030.

Additionally, approximately 3 260 graduate teachers are expected to be placed in schools this year. These new teachers are to be deployed in identified priority areas such as science, mathematics and technology, within the foundation phase rural areas.

The national budget make special mention of the National Education Collaboration Trust, which was set up in July last year. This Trust aims to bring together the government, labour, business and civil society in a partnership to improve education.

See the link below for more details about the budget.
http://www.fin24.com/Budget/Budget-infographic-20140225

March 2014: Improve your Time Management skills

Improve your Time Management skills

Would you like to achieve more in less time? The Assessment College course in time management will help you to take control of your time.

Identify and deliver what is important, not only what is urgent. Tackle your personal demons, such as procrastination, and increase your productivity. Reduce your stress and deal effectively with time-wasters.

What will you learn in the Time Management programme?

  • How to maximise your personal effectiveness
  • The difference between being “busy” and “productive”
  • How to prioritise using decision matrices
  • How to use to-do lists and the ABC prioritisation technique
  • How to say “no” to time wasters and beat the most common ones
  • How to write SMART goals
  • How to effectively delegate tasks
  • How to manage voicemail to reduce time spent checking messages
  • How to tame technology and save time
  • How to apply the Pareto principle (80/20 rule) to time management issues
  • How to handle interruptions
  • How to beat procrastination

Assessment College also offers the larger programme ‘Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success Skills Programme’, which will assist you with improving the skills below:

  • Effective communication
  • Customer service
  • Effective team work
  • Handling workplace bullies
  • Applying basic business ethics
  • Understanding the soft skills that employers value

Enrol now by sending an email to assessment@assess.co.za or contact our Customer Service Department on 011 544 4660 / 011 678 0126.

We can also quote for in-house training for 10 or more learners to upskill your staff. Please send your requirements to assessment@assess.co.za.

March 2014: A walk in the park? SANParks and Assessment College

A walk in the park? SANParks and Assessment College 

Assessment College is very proud of its partnership with the South African National Parks (SANParks). Assessment College is assisting SANParks with its application for accreditation with the Culture, Tourism, Hospitality, Sports Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA).

In 2013, Assessment College and SANParks officially signed a service level agreement. Assessment College began the project by conducting a fact finding exercise in order to better understand the context within which SANParks operates, as well as the challenges and demands it faces. The information gathered has been helpful in further defining the scope for SANParks and areas of emphasis in seeking their accreditation.

SANParks has been in existence since 1926, and now boasts a complement of over 4 000 staff members.  In 2011 training and development was identified internally as one of the strategic vehicles in assisting the organisation not only to re-invent itself, but help meet its various challenges head-on.

This partnership with Assessment College solidifies SANParks commitment to developing and supporting its staff. We look forward to “cultivating” our ongoing partnership.

March 2014: Madeline Trollope appointed as Training Solutions Manager of Assessment College of SA (Pty) Ltd

Madeline Trollope appointed as Training Solutions Manager of Assessment College of SA (Pty)

Ltd

Assessment College is delighted to announce that Madeline Trollope has been appointed as Manager: Assessment College.

 Madeline joined City & Guilds in July 2013 as Vocational Business Consultant, advising both City & Guilds and Assessment College on strategic projects. She holds a Masters degree in Mathematics Education, a BSc Honours in Energy Studies and a BSC degree. She also holds a Project Management certificate and a diploma in Management Studies.

Madeline’s previous work experience includes Vice-Rector Academic: Engineering at Central Johannesburg College, Principal of Parktown College and Mathematics Publisher at Heinemann Publishers.

 We are looking forward to further growing Assessment College under Madeline’s guidance, as well as the innovations and projects to be generated under her leadership. Outside of South Africa, Assessment College delivers services as part of City & Guilds Training Solutions.

March 2014: Highlights from the SAQA RPL Conference February 2014

Highlights from the SAQA RPL Conference February 2014

Shirley Stamelman: Project Manager: Assessment College of SA (Pty) Ltd

In February 2014 SAQA hosted a Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) conference. During the conference, there were many discussions about the implementation of RPL in the General and Further Education and Training Qualifications Sub-Framework, the Higher Education Qualifications Sub-Framework and the Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework. Delegates considered approaches, processes, tools and models that did work, as well as some that did not work.  Participants identified both challenges and solutions.

The frank, open and honest sharing was inspiring, and gave credence to the fact that the players involved are sincerely focused on the ultimate improvement of the process. One issue discussed was the managing of learners and employers expectations.  Does a successful outcome mean a salary increase or a promotion? Do the gaps identified indicate performance problems which can potentially be used against the learners?

The case studies presented were encouraging, different and interesting. They were as diverse as the discussions around RPL for licence to practise, the Real Estate sector where learners are being forced into the process by legislation, RPL implemented in various SETAs, industries such as pulp and paper industry, construction workers, artisans in prison, the marine industry, South African police and many more. What is apparent is that different sectors have different needs, and also face different challenges. Common amongst all is that RPL is specialised. It is not a quick fix or an easy way out. It is rich, meaningful and, if done correctly, should be developmental.

RPL should recognise and celebrate what we do know, rather than zoom in on the areas that we don’t know. Gaps should be considered development opportunities, not shortcomings to be used to people’s disadvantage.

International speakers from Canada, Hong Kong, Namibia, Seychelles and the United States of America confirmed that RPL can be used for many different purposes. RPL for access to education featured quite strongly, specifically in Canada and America.

One of the breakaway sessions was an actual simulated RPL assessment. So much talking, theorising, philosophising and researching can frazzle the brain, and this interactive mini-workshop, where delegates actually got to see RPL in action, was a breath of fresh air. It also highlighted immediately the obvious pitfalls, dangers and frustrations faced by both the learner and the RPL assessor.

We have some very passionate, knowledgeable and capable people working in our educational arena. Whilst we often see the negative impact, failed attempts and mismanaged use of government funds despite efforts to the contrary, it was encouraging to get the sense that this is far from a lost cause.

Looking back, the first RPL conference conducted in 2011 was a very different conference to the recently held 2014 conference. We have made progress. There is an increase in the implementation of RPL, and the number of case studies provided at the conference was proof of this. A few years ago, the purpose and approach to RPL had so many different and confused interpretations and it was difficult to find a common understanding.  Nowadays this common understanding is growing and this increased clarity helps us to grow the scale of implementation.

Heidi Bolton summed it up nicely when she said that whilst two years ago there were small islands of excellent practice, those islands are in fact expanding quite dramatically.

March 2014: HRDC - Human Resource Development Council - Public Notice

HRDC - Human Resource Development Council - Public Notice 

TERTIARY EDUCATION COUNCIL (T.E.C) TRANSFORMS INTO THE HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL (HRDC) IN BOTSWANA

The Government of Botswana has through the approval of Human Resource Development Council Act No 17 of 2013 established the Human Resources Development Council (HRDC) that became operational on the 8th November 2013.

This therefore means the Tertiary Education Council (T.E.C) has ceased to exist and has been replaced by the Human Resource Development Council. The transition was assented to by the Minister of Education and Skills Development Order of the 8th November 2013 to commence the Human Resource Development Council under Act 17 of 2013.

HRDC OBJECTICES AMONG OTHERS ARE TO:

  1. Provide for policy advice on all matters of national human resource development;
  2. Co-ordinate and promote the implementation of the national human resource development strategy;
  3. Prepare the national human resource development plans; and
  4. Plan and advise on tertiary education financing and work-place learning

IMPLICATIONS OF THE MOST NOTABLE CHANGES ON TERTIARY EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS (TEIS) AND EMPLOYERS

Notably, Section 38 (l) of the HRDC Act provides for transitional arrangements in tertiary education institutions, which were registered and accredited by T.E.C. This therefore means the tertiary education institutions will retain their registration and accreditation status under the new Botswana Qualifications Authority established under the BQA Act No 24 of 2013.

KINDLY NOTE THAT THE SERVICES OUTLINED BELOW SHALL CONTRINUE TO BE RENDERED BY HRDC UNTIL 31 MARCH 2014

  1. Registration of institutions offering Diploma level programmes and above
  2. Processing of accreditation of programme applications
  3. Programme approval
  4. Accreditation of institutional applications for those offering Diploma level programmes.

FURTHER NOTE THAT EFFECTIVE 1ST APRIL 2014:

  1. Registration and accreditation of institutions at tertiary level previously undertaken by the Tertiary Education Council (T.E.C) know known as the Human Resource Development Council (HRDC) will now be rendered by Botswana Qualifications Authority (BQA) previously known as Botswana Training Authority (BOTA).
  2. The administration of the former Vocational Training Fund (VTF) now called the Human Resource Development Fund will be administered by the HRDC.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT

Faith Rapuleng-Tuelo

Human Resource Development Council

Private Bag BR-108

Gaborone

Tel: +267 393 0741 and 391 9078

Email: ftuelo@tec.org.bw

Website: www.tec.org.bw

March 2014: General Education and Training Certificate for Adults

General Education and Training Certificate for Adults.

Public invitation to comment on the draft qualification

Umalusi, the Quality Council for General and Further Education and Training, is required to ensure the development of qualifications necessary for its sector.

The draft of the new General Education and Training Certificate for Adults (GETCA), a qualification at Level 1 of the National Qualifications Framework, has been published on Umalusi’s website, www.umalsui.org.za, for comments. The GETCA is a substantive reworking of the GETC: ABET (NQF Level 1) which it will ultimately replace. The new qualification is curriculum-based, and requires adults to pass a minimum of four subjects.

The qualification has also been gazetted on 7th March 2014 for public comment. The Gazette number is 37413.

All stakeholders and members of the public with an interest in adult education and training are invited to provide their comments and inputs on the draft GETCA. Written comments should reach Umalusi by 30 April 2014.

Written comments about the GETCA can be e-mailed to helen@umalusi.org.za or sent to:

The CEO,

Postnet Suite 102

Private Bag X1

Queenswood

Pretoria

South Africa

For attention: Ms Helen Matshoba

 

Availability of documents

The draft General Education and Training Certificate for Adults, a qualification at level 1 of the NQF is available on the following websites:

www.umalusi.org.za

www.saqa.org.za

Hard copies of the draft GETCA will be available upon request from the address provided.



March 2014: Can South Africa become an entrepreneurial state?

Can South Africa become an entrepreneurial state?

Shirley Stamelman: Project Manager: Assessment College of SA (Pty) Ltd

Entrepreneurship is not merely a course or a programme, it is a mind-set and a way of thinking. The requirements for success are not skills that can be taught in a classroom through knowledge transfer, entrepreneurship must be nurtured over time, through constant building, repetition, mentoring, encouragement and hands-on guidance and assistance. If that is true, is there a point in teaching entrepreneurship courses?

Research and trend analyses in South Africa have suggested that new venture creation and entrepreneurship interventions have not achieved the desired outcomes.

Shirley Stamelman, Project Manager at Assessment College, point to recruitment as a key issue. She says ‘Often learners have been incorrectly selected from a pool of school leavers, graduates or unemployed in an attempt to give these particular individuals an opportunity for growth. We have learned from this, and find that the secret to success for this type of intervention is that a learner embarking on this type of programme must have an existing skill.  It is this skill that will serve as the basis of the entrepreneurial opportunities that the program will explore and grow.’

Shirley adds, ‘from our experience and research, whilst knowledge must be gained and skills acquired, in the case of SMEs and entrepreneurs the needs and approach are most often very different.  If there is money to spend, let’s spend it wisely. If we want to consider entrepreneurship, don’t attempt this in isolation but offer it within particular contexts, with a long term view of gaining maximum impact. If we are going to do it, let’s do it properly.’

March 2014: For the love of the game

FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

Marelize Wagener
Research and Development Specialist and Registered Industrial Psychologist

If you consider the fact that action learning has been fundamental in adult education for many years and that ice breakers and training games have been used for decades with great success it is somewhat surprising that the idea of games crossing the entertainment line into business territory occurred only a few years ago. I am referring to gamification. Currently gamification is one of the most popular topics in the HR industry. More and more companies are becoming aware of its benefits.

Gamification has been defined as the use of game thinking and game mechanisms in non-game contexts such as the workplace, to engage users for the purpose of problem-solving and learning. Basically it’s taking the fundamental nature of games (fun and play) and applying it to the world of work. Companies are increasingly using gaming principles not only for training and development, but also for other HR processes such as recruitment and selection, leadership and career development. Companies are gradually adding gaming elements to everyday processes because it improves engagement, motivates people, influences behaviour, stimulates creativity and enhances learning. This is because most people like to have fun, collaborate and compete.

If we have known the value of applying gaming concepts in training for years, then why did it take so long for business to buy into this simple concept and use it in other areas? And how long will it take before this “new” trend will become the norm?

Experts believe that the time wasn’t ripe for exploiting gamification before that technological advancement and social media boosts gamification and that the majority of today’s workforce is the right mix – a generation who can’t imagine a world without technology and social networks as well as an older generation who embraced gaming in their youth.

Even though gamification is still a rather quiet revolution in South Africa, it has been predicted for 2014 that more than 70% of the Forbes Global 2000 companies will have at least one gamified application.

How long will you wait before you explore the possibilities for your company; before you start doing what you do for the love of the game?

February 2014: Practical Matters: What young people think about vocational education in England, South Africa & the Netherlands

Practical Matters: What young people think about vocational education in England, South Africa

& the Netherlands

Research conducted by the City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development

Project background

There is a widespread assumption that young people need to engage in HE, rather than VET for their future progression in to work and to improve their social and economic prosperity – thus messages aimed at young people are skewed towards promoting HE options rather than VET.  The resultant poor perceptions of vocational education can lead young learners to prematurely and unfairly discount this route

Project overview and approach

The City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development (CSD) has conducted a small scale qualitative research project in England, South Africa and the Netherlands to explore these and other related issues. The project involved a series of focus groups surveys and one-to-one interviews with young people between the ages of 14 and 20 years.

Key findings:

  • Young people value vocational education and training, but often do not have a full understanding of the employment paths available to them
  • Young people recognise the terms ‘practical learning’ and ‘skills’ more than ‘vocational education and training’. The terminology used by policy makers, practitioners and researchers does not correspond with what young people understand and use.
  • Young people want to know their options and routes for progression. Learners do not understand the learning pathways and options available to them and want to know how they can progress.
  • Young people want to make informed, independent decisions. The careers advice and guidance systems available are not giving young people sufficient information with which to make an informed decision.
  • Young people have opinions on how to improve their education system. Young people are a resource on which policy makers and practitioners can draw, rather than constructing systems around them into which they have little input.

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February 2014: Assessment College Annual Associate and Licensee Conference 2014

Assessment College Annual Awards 

We are very proud of the hard work and dedication that our Associates and Licensees contribute towards the skills development and training industry on a daily basis. At the recent Gala Dinner held as part of the annual Conference, Assessment College was able to recognise some outstanding Associates and Licensees, when the annual awards were presented.

We would like to congratulate the following awards winners:

Licensee of the year

  • Mr Alvin Moss from Alvin Moss Consultants

Outstanding consultancy work

  • Mr Tommie Richards from Tom Richards & Ass
  • Riaan Nell from Ritro Academy

Participation in learning material development

  • Mr Herman de Vries from Bonisa Consulting
  • Ms Ida Snyman
  • Ms Debbie Regensburg from Comficor Consulting

Participation in international training

  • Mr Hendrik Nel
  • Mr Craig Winter
  • Mr Alfie Wagner from ETD Consulting
  • Mr Herman de Vries from Binisa Consulting
  • Mr Leonard Halliday 

February 2014: Assessment College Annual Associate and Licensee Conference 2014

Assessment College Annual Associate and Licensee Conference 2014

Over 40 delegates attended Assessment College’s annual Associate and Licensee Conference on 30-31 January at the charming Little Tuscany in Bryanston, Johannesburg. The conference was busy and vibrant, with delegates networking both with guest speakers and with long-time colleagues from around the country.

We provide a summary of presentations for those who were unable to join us at the conference.

 White Paper on Post-School Education and Training  - Gerda Magnus, Chief Director for Programmes and Curriculums, Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET)

The White Paper sets out a vision for the post-school education and training system that South Africa wishes to achieve by 2030. The post-school system includes all education and training provision for those who have completed school, those who did not complete their schooling, and those who never attended school.

The White Paper highlights strategies to improve the capacity of post-school education and training to meet South Africa’s needs. It outlines policy directions to guide the DHET and the institutions for which it is responsible in order to contribute to building a developmental state with a vibrant democracy and a flourishing economy.

With over 3.2 million South Africans aged between 15 and 24 who are not in employment, education or training (the "NEETs”), there is an urgency about providing opportunities for effective education and training that leads to employability and to economic growth. Post-school education and training is critical to addressing poverty and unemployment.

Further, the White Paper launches a new type of institution, community colleges. Community colleges are planned to cater for South Africans who never attended school and therefore cannot apply to study at colleges or universities.

The Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) - Heidi Peters, Deputy Director Occupational Qualifications Development, QCTO

The QCTO is one of the three Quality Councils, each of which is responsible for a qualifications sub-framework on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). The Council for Higher Education (CHE) and Umalusi make up the other two Quality Councils.

The QCTO is responsible for standards setting and quality assurance of occupational qualifications on the Trades and Occupations sub-framework.  As part of the process, the QCTO appoints Assessment Quality Partners (AQPs) who are tasked to manage the assessment process on behalf of the QCTO. The AQPs are responsible for developing, maintaining and implementing external assessments and coordinating and managing external assessment processes, as well as maintaining a register of assessors and moderators from which assessors and moderators for the external summative assessment are selected.

 

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) - John Samuel, Consultant, SPP Project Solutions

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are an effective way to build capacity in education and training. The private sector can establish successful partnerships to implement innovative and large-scale solutions in which the public sector is a partner.

 

 Turning the South African Economy Around - Dr Tholsia Naidoo, Deputy Chair, Association of Private Providers of Education, Training and Development (APPETD)

Effective implementation of skills development is critical to the growth of the South African economy, said Dr Tholsia Naidoo. And the need is so great that government cannot do it alone – the private sector is critical to broadening access, increasing choice and implementing high quality solutions. South Africa needs the following:

  • Well designed programmes and materials for areas of scarce skills
  • Well designed and managed curriculums
  • More workplaces  involved in training, with greater integration of training environments and practical experience

 

The second day of the conference focused on more internal matters. These included:

The internal moderation process of Assessment College - Deon Vogel, Project Co-ordinator, Assessment College

The facilitation process and how to improve quality - Dr Fransie Terblanché: Project Manager, Assessment College

Foundational learning products - Angie Booysen, Media Works – the Foundational Learning Competencies (FLCs) in mathematical literacy and English replace the Fundamentals at NQF Levels 2, 3 and 4.

Soft skills for Business Success - Shirley Stamelman, Project Manager, Assessment College

Assessment College’s “Mastering Soft Skills for Business Success” skills programme was launched at the conference, and is now available to the public, as well as to licensees. Studies from Harvard University, the Carnegie Foundation and the Stanford Research Institute show that 85% of job success is connected to people skills with only 15% to technical knowledge. This makes “soft skills” an essential part of employability and progression within the workplace.

Assessment College’s soft skills programme covers the skills necessary to achieving success in the business world. The skills programme is aligned to SAQA unit standards and will provide NQF credits in the applicable fields. Content includes time management, team work, communication skills and business ethics, and will be expanded soon to include additional topics requested by Assessment College’s customers and licensees.

 

Assessment College would like to thank everyone who attended our annual conference and who contributed to making it a success.

February 2014: Inadequate careers advice for young people

Inadequate careers advice for young people

Philippa Melaniphy, Communications and Media Officer at City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development, explains the need for adequate careers advice and guidance for young people.

There is a significant mismatch between young people's career aspirations and future skills needs, according to a new survey of young people in England by the Education and Employers Taskforce. Less than one per cent of young people who took part in the survey were interested in many careers, where demand is predicted to rise in the UK economy, including plumbing, hotel work, and human resources. 

Half of all young people’s career interests lay in just three of 25 broad occupational sectors, suggesting a lack of awareness about the breadth of career opportunities open to them.

It seems that careers advice is failing to guide young people through education and onto sustainable career paths. This is something which City & Guilds has been concerned about for some time.

Back in 2011, research by City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development (CSD) found that young people were far more likely to select courses based on interest, rather than with specific career or progression paths in mind.

Just as worrying, a third of young people surveyed as part of the New Directions report said that they hadn’t received any careers advice from anyone, a statistic reflected in City & Guilds Ways into Work. At the same time, the majority of parents surveyed by CSD said they felt that young people had difficulty adjusting to the world of work.

It seems that our recommendations still hold true. Better career guidance is urgently needed to help young people make informed decisions about education and careers. Employers have a vital role in bridging the chasm between education and jobs, to help the next generation of young people into work.​ 

February 2014: Assessment College helps build tomorrow’s Olympic coaches

Assessment College helps build tomorrow’s Olympic coaches.

The Employment Tax Incentive Act came into effect in January 2014. The Act 
proposes a youth wage subsidy aimed at paving the way for on-the-job training.
Problems that youth face in finding jobs
Approximately half of South Africa’s youth are unemployed. The biggest problems 
facing youth employment are that they lack the skills to become employed and, that 
they lack experience in the workplace. The paper reported that employers view 
inexperienced skilled workers as a liability, and further, education is not a 
replacement for experience.
The Employment Tax Incentive Act aims to reduce the financial cost on employers 
hiring youths and therefore proposes to make the training of those employees more 
affordable. The Employment Tax Incentive Act encourages job seekers to become 
more active in their job search. 
The Youth Wage Subsidy 
The Youth Wage Subsidy aims to improve employment prospects for youth. It seeks
to reduce the cost and risk of hiring a young and inexperienced workforce and aims
to provide on-the-job experience and stimulate a demand for labour. 
The government hopes that this Act will promote employment for young people and 
create jobs in special economic zones once this legislation, which aims to provide for
them, has been promulgated. In terms of The Act, employers will receive a tax 
incentive to employ young workers for a maximum of two years under certain 
conditions.
On-the-job experience is crucial for attaining the appropriate skills, as well as for 
future employment prospects. Government is committed to work with the private 
sector to enhance employment opportunities and skills development for all workers, 
especially for the youth with limited work experience.
Who does the Employment Tax Incentive apply to?
The scheme is available to employers who employ South Africans citizens and 
asylum seekers with valid permits aged between 18 and 29. There are however a 
few exclusions which include:
• Government departments;
• Municipalities;
• Public entities; and
• Employers not registered for PAYE.
Employers can also not claim in respect of following employees:
• Employees employed before 1 October 2013;
• Domestic workers;
• Connected persons (employees related to the employer); and
• If the employee is paid less than the minimum wage applicable to the 
employer.
What can employers claim?
Employers may claim 50% of an employee’s remuneration if the employee earns 
less than R 2 000 (if the remuneration is not subject to any minimum wage 
provisions). In respect of employees earning between R 2 001 and R 4 000 an 
1amount of R 1 000 can be claimed. For employees earning between R 4 001 and R 
6000 a sliding formula will be used.
Employers can claim the incentive in respect of qualifying employees for a period of 
two years. The value of the incentive however halves in the employee’s second year 
of employment. The incentive falls away on the commencement of the employee’s 
third year of employment.
How to claim Employment Tax Incentive 
South African Revenue Service (SARS) will publish further details on how the 
incentive will work and how to claim. Checks and balances had been put in place to 
ensure the incentive will not lead to discrimination against older workers.
How can Assessment College help you to get the full benefit from the 
Employment Tax Incentive? 
Assessment College offer the following accredited courses that will benefit your 
company in implementing the Employment Tax Incentive.
• Coaching course
The youth that are employed will benefit by having a coach. A coach is a 
facilitator who coaches them to be competent performers in the workplace. 
This training programme focuses on the coaching process.
• Mentoring course
Mentoring in the workplace is a one-on-one relationship where the mentor 
shares knowledge and experience through interactive teaching with the 
mentee. This course shows how to apply the mentor model. Mentors will 
minimise the risk of hiring inexperienced workers.
• Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme
Soft skills are the ability to communicate effectively, promote teamwork within 
your organisation, present ideas, manage projects and people, solve 
problems and provide excellent customer care. They are critical to the 
success of the business. 
Our Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme will prepare 
the youth workers for employment.

Assessment College is proud to be involved in a recent project, together with the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) and CATHSSETA, to train Provincial Coach Developers (PCDs) across the Limpopo, Northern Cape and North West Province in South Africa.

The project resulted from SASCOC identifying the need to build the capacity of Coach Developers within the sport sector. SASCOC wanted to address this need through providing coaches with the opportunity to undergo training in facilitation, assessment and moderation. The eleven National Federations Athletics, Basketball, Chess, Cricket, Football, Gymnastics, Netball, Rugby, Swimming, Tennis and Volleyball were identified as PCDs to participate in this capacity building programme.

Fransie Terblanché, Project Manager at Assessment College, said that this is a unique project for Assessment College, as the knowledge part of the course was provided by SASCOC facilitators within the content of different sport codes. Thereafter, it has been the responsibility of Assessment College to ensure that the learners (PCDs) were capable of completing the portfolios of evidence for the three Unit Standards.

As part of the project, the Assessment College facilitators are required consolidate the work covered by the SASCOC facilitators, while focusing on the formative and summative assessment requirements.  A tutorial on specific outcomes has been incorporated, which covers the US’ requirements on theoretical background, in preparation for the final summative assessments. As the project progresses, Fransie says that the participants are well motivated and serious in their intent to go out and make a difference in improving the competence of junior coaches within each particular sports code. She comments that the facilitators are enjoying everyone's enthusiasm and drive while participating in teh activities and assignments. She adds, 'the project is half way through and we can already see how the PCD's have developed and capacitated themselves through their participation in this programme'.

February 2014: Goodbye but not farewell

Goodbye but not farewell.

The Employment Tax Incentive Act came into effect in January 2014. The Act 
proposes a youth wage subsidy aimed at paving the way for on-the-job training.
Problems that youth face in finding jobs
Approximately half of South Africa’s youth are unemployed. The biggest problems 
facing youth employment are that they lack the skills to become employed and, that 
they lack experience in the workplace. The paper reported that employers view 
inexperienced skilled workers as a liability, and further, education is not a 
replacement for experience.
The Employment Tax Incentive Act aims to reduce the financial cost on employers 
hiring youths and therefore proposes to make the training of those employees more 
affordable. The Employment Tax Incentive Act encourages job seekers to become 
more active in their job search. 
The Youth Wage Subsidy 
The Youth Wage Subsidy aims to improve employment prospects for youth. It seeks
to reduce the cost and risk of hiring a young and inexperienced workforce and aims
to provide on-the-job experience and stimulate a demand for labour. 
The government hopes that this Act will promote employment for young people and 
create jobs in special economic zones once this legislation, which aims to provide for
them, has been promulgated. In terms of The Act, employers will receive a tax 
incentive to employ young workers for a maximum of two years under certain 
conditions.
On-the-job experience is crucial for attaining the appropriate skills, as well as for 
future employment prospects. Government is committed to work with the private 
sector to enhance employment opportunities and skills development for all workers, 
especially for the youth with limited work experience.
Who does the Employment Tax Incentive apply to?
The scheme is available to employers who employ South Africans citizens and 
asylum seekers with valid permits aged between 18 and 29. There are however a 
few exclusions which include:
• Government departments;
• Municipalities;
• Public entities; and
• Employers not registered for PAYE.
Employers can also not claim in respect of following employees:
• Employees employed before 1 October 2013;
• Domestic workers;
• Connected persons (employees related to the employer); and
• If the employee is paid less than the minimum wage applicable to the 
employer.
What can employers claim?
Employers may claim 50% of an employee’s remuneration if the employee earns 
less than R 2 000 (if the remuneration is not subject to any minimum wage 
provisions). In respect of employees earning between R 2 001 and R 4 000 an 
1amount of R 1 000 can be claimed. For employees earning between R 4 001 and R 
6000 a sliding formula will be used.
Employers can claim the incentive in respect of qualifying employees for a period of 
two years. The value of the incentive however halves in the employee’s second year 
of employment. The incentive falls away on the commencement of the employee’s 
third year of employment.
How to claim Employment Tax Incentive 
South African Revenue Service (SARS) will publish further details on how the 
incentive will work and how to claim. Checks and balances had been put in place to 
ensure the incentive will not lead to discrimination against older workers.
How can Assessment College help you to get the full benefit from the 
Employment Tax Incentive? 
Assessment College offer the following accredited courses that will benefit your 
company in implementing the Employment Tax Incentive.
• Coaching course
The youth that are employed will benefit by having a coach. A coach is a 
facilitator who coaches them to be competent performers in the workplace. 
This training programme focuses on the coaching process.
• Mentoring course
Mentoring in the workplace is a one-on-one relationship where the mentor 
shares knowledge and experience through interactive teaching with the 
mentee. This course shows how to apply the mentor model. Mentors will 
minimise the risk of hiring inexperienced workers.
• Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme
Soft skills are the ability to communicate effectively, promote teamwork within 
your organisation, present ideas, manage projects and people, solve 
problems and provide excellent customer care. They are critical to the 
success of the business. 
Our Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme will prepare 
the youth workers for employment.

It is with a sad heart that we have to bid farewell to Leon Sinclair. After more than ten years, Leon will be leaving Assessment College to take up a post as Director: National Examinations and Assessment in the Department of Higher Education a nd Training (DHET). 

Leon joined Assessment College in 2004 as manager of sales and marketing. As an education specialist he designed workshops, develop training materials and acted as a technical advisor in setting up iSeleSele Property Academy, Business Start-Up training, as well as numerous other new products. Leon was also instrumental in helping launch Assessment College in Namibia and Botswana.

Following City & Guilds' acquisition of Assessment College in 2012, Leon was appointed as Manager of Training Solutions and served as Champion of Assessment College at the level of the Assessment College Board. He was on the board of the Association of Private Providers in Education, Training and Development (Appetd) and currently represents private providers on the FET Chamber of the ETDP SETA. 

We will miss Leon's experience and expertise, and wish him all the very best in his new role. We look forward to hearing of his success, and to our ongoing relationship in advancing education and training.

January 2014: Highlights of the White Paper

Highlights of the White Paper.

The Employment Tax Incentive Act came into effect in January 2014. The Act 
proposes a youth wage subsidy aimed at paving the way for on-the-job training.
Problems that youth face in finding jobs
Approximately half of South Africa’s youth are unemployed. The biggest problems 
facing youth employment are that they lack the skills to become employed and, that 
they lack experience in the workplace. The paper reported that employers view 
inexperienced skilled workers as a liability, and further, education is not a 
replacement for experience.
The Employment Tax Incentive Act aims to reduce the financial cost on employers 
hiring youths and therefore proposes to make the training of those employees more 
affordable. The Employment Tax Incentive Act encourages job seekers to become 
more active in their job search. 
The Youth Wage Subsidy 
The Youth Wage Subsidy aims to improve employment prospects for youth. It seeks
to reduce the cost and risk of hiring a young and inexperienced workforce and aims
to provide on-the-job experience and stimulate a demand for labour. 
The government hopes that this Act will promote employment for young people and 
create jobs in special economic zones once this legislation, which aims to provide for
them, has been promulgated. In terms of The Act, employers will receive a tax 
incentive to employ young workers for a maximum of two years under certain 
conditions.
On-the-job experience is crucial for attaining the appropriate skills, as well as for 
future employment prospects. Government is committed to work with the private 
sector to enhance employment opportunities and skills development for all workers, 
especially for the youth with limited work experience.
Who does the Employment Tax Incentive apply to?
The scheme is available to employers who employ South Africans citizens and 
asylum seekers with valid permits aged between 18 and 29. There are however a 
few exclusions which include:
• Government departments;
• Municipalities;
• Public entities; and
• Employers not registered for PAYE.
Employers can also not claim in respect of following employees:
• Employees employed before 1 October 2013;
• Domestic workers;
• Connected persons (employees related to the employer); and
• If the employee is paid less than the minimum wage applicable to the 
employer.
What can employers claim?
Employers may claim 50% of an employee’s remuneration if the employee earns 
less than R 2 000 (if the remuneration is not subject to any minimum wage 
provisions). In respect of employees earning between R 2 001 and R 4 000 an 
1amount of R 1 000 can be claimed. For employees earning between R 4 001 and R 
6000 a sliding formula will be used.
Employers can claim the incentive in respect of qualifying employees for a period of 
two years. The value of the incentive however halves in the employee’s second year 
of employment. The incentive falls away on the commencement of the employee’s 
third year of employment.
How to claim Employment Tax Incentive 
South African Revenue Service (SARS) will publish further details on how the 
incentive will work and how to claim. Checks and balances had been put in place to 
ensure the incentive will not lead to discrimination against older workers.
How can Assessment College help you to get the full benefit from the 
Employment Tax Incentive? 
Assessment College offer the following accredited courses that will benefit your 
company in implementing the Employment Tax Incentive.
• Coaching course
The youth that are employed will benefit by having a coach. A coach is a 
facilitator who coaches them to be competent performers in the workplace. 
This training programme focuses on the coaching process.
• Mentoring course
Mentoring in the workplace is a one-on-one relationship where the mentor 
shares knowledge and experience through interactive teaching with the 
mentee. This course shows how to apply the mentor model. Mentors will 
minimise the risk of hiring inexperienced workers.
• Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme
Soft skills are the ability to communicate effectively, promote teamwork within 
your organisation, present ideas, manage projects and people, solve 
problems and provide excellent customer care. They are critical to the 
success of the business. 
Our Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme will prepare 
the youth workers for employment.

The White Paper for Post-School Education and Training, launched by the Minister of Higher Education and Training, Blade Nzimande on 15 January 2014, positions Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) as the institutions whereby scarce and critical skills will be developed, which is urgently needed for South Africa’s economic development. 

The vision of the White Paper is a single, integrated post-school system with a focus on collaboration between the institutions. Artisan training will become the centre of South Africa’s post-school training.

Here are some of the highlights of the White Paper:

 • FET colleges will undergo a name change to Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges  

 Further Education and Training (FET) colleges have been renamed Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. 

• TVET colleges will have a drastic increase in student intake 

 The White Paper envisages expanding enrolments at the TVET colleges from 650 000 currently to 2,5 million by 2030. This four-fold increase of numbers in the college sector by 2030 will require huge infrastructural and human resource development. By 2030 there should be at least one institution offering TVET programmes in every district within the country.

• TVET colleges and universities need to develop scarce skills 

The focus of the White Paper is on prioritising the production of critical skills in order to lift South Africa out of the current scarce skills shortage crisis that it is facing. 

• Complete review of college curricula 

The white paper reads, ‘the current mix of programmes and qualifications within FET colleges is complex to administer, difficult for students and parents to understand and often poorly quality-assured’.It announces a complete review of college curricula, with the aim of consolidating and streamlining it. Relevant employers, government departments and other stakeholders will be invited to take part in this review. The paper states that the private sector will have the opportunity to give advice to the colleges on the issue of curricula.

 • Monitor the quality of education in colleges 

The Quality Councils will assure the quality of assessments, and the new South African Institute for Vocational and Continuing Education and Training (SAIVCET) will fulfil a developmental, monitoring and evaluation role. SAIVCET will co-ordinate training in order to enhance coherence and articulation, while upgrading the technical knowledge and pedagogical skills of existing staff. Quality Councils, including Umalusi, will be given more flexibility 1to quality assure qualifications on NQF levels from which they were previously restricted.

• Alignment between universities, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) 

The White Paper states that within the next few years, there will be an improvement in the alignment between universities, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) in an effort to improve student and learner mobility across sectors. The envisaged system will need to provide paths for articulation between various qualifications.

• Establishing an effective artisan training system 

The development of a centralised national skills planning system will use input from key public sector institutions to be able to establish an effective artisan training system. One that will be able to produce 30 000 artisans by 2030. 

• Developing Community Colleges and Public Adult Learning Centres (PALCs) 

 The White Paper introduces a new type of institution in the form of community colleges.These will be predominantly aimed at the youth and adults who have not completed Grade 12, as well as for those who have never attended formal school. The community colleges will build on existing public adult learning centres and will work together with community-owned and private institutions, such as church-run training centres. The development of the community colleges and integrating them with Public Adult Learning Centres (PALCs), will assist in facilitating adults who have not completed schooling, and/or did not qualify to study at TVET colleges or universities. The aim is to enrol approximately one million people for learning opportunities at community colleges by 2030. All qualifications at PALCs will comply with South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA) requirements and the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).

• Improved access, quality and cost-effectiveness of post-school distance education

 The diversity of provision, based on open learning principles, is described in the White Paper as ‘a strategic enabler to improving learning opportunities across the post-school education and training sector. The providers will need to engage and collaborate in sharing infrastructure, learning resources and staff capacity, to contribute to improved access, quality and cost-effectiveness of distance education.’ The White Paper encourages groups of institutions establishing multi-purpose educational facilities to facilitate mixed-mode arrangements. Further, the post-school distance education landscape will be based on open learning principles. 

• TVET colleges to cater for students and staff with disabilities 

Developing a policy framework twill strive to improve access and success within post-school education and training for people with disabilities. TVET 2colleges in particular currently lack the capacity to cater for students and staff with disabilities.A strategic policy framework is necessary in order to guide the improvement of access to, and success in, post-school education and training (including in private institutions) for people with disabilities. 

• Integrate Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) into the post-school education and training system The White Paper promotes the integration of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) into the post-school education and training system.

Such recognition must not be ad hoc, but must rather form an integral part of the whole system.

• Universities to focus on scarce skills and research

 The White Paper envisages a more modest, but still significant, increase in the planned intake at universities. Universities will be expected to enrol 1,6 million students in 2030, from 937 000 students in 2011. This plan increases university access from a current 17 percent to 25 percent of prospective students. Minister Blade Nzimande also stated at the launch of the White Paper that South Africa needs outstanding researchers that are capable of producing ground-breaking work. This is where universities, regarded as centres of knowledge production, are crucial. Universities will target the growth of scarce skills, while continuing to provide general academic education, in the natural sciences and humanities. The current tertiary education system does not cater for the needs of the country’s economy. The White Paper hopes to address these issues relating to skills shortages.

The paper specifies the following strategies across the sector:

 • Improving the management and governance of training and vocational education and training(TVET) colleges.

• Increasing employers input into curriculum development at all levels.

• Enabling the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) to play an important role in promoting and facilitating links between colleges and employers in order to expand learnership and internship opportunities.

• Committing to progressively introducing free education for the poor in South African universities.

• Reviewing the regulation and quality assurance of private post-school institutions.

• The role of the public sector and business in the initiative to broaden further education 

The White Paper plans to link education and the workplace through the design of training systems, including curricula. This will require close co-operation between education and training providers and employers. The policy makes provision for the private sector to play its part, through training unskilled people in different fields, and emphasises cooperation with employers in the future. The White paper encourages fast-tracking transformation of the post-schooling environment, and states that the South Africa economy will not grow unless education is a priority.

• South Africa Institute for Vocational and Continuing Education and Training 

The newly established South Africa Institute for Vocational and Continuing Education and Training (SAVCT) will provide support to the college sector and develop innovative curricula. SAVCT will also be responsible for upskilling existing staff, providing experts to develop course materials, advising the minister on vocational education and monitoring and evaluating TVET colleges and other public colleges. It emphasises workplace learning, and preparing employees for the labour market and thereby developing skills ub economic self-sufficiency. 

• Improve the quality of education and training in post-school education 

The White Paper sets out a broad policy for expanding post-school provision. This should then assist with improving access to education and training opportunities and strengthening the institutions of post schooling, of TVET Colleges, universities, colleges and adult education centres to improve the quality of education.

Focused attention according to the paper will be given to:

· improving the quality through appropriate programmes

· upgrading of lecturers

· capacity building of management and governance

· improved learner support

· information technology systems

· setting up partnerships with employers and mainstreaming funding

· developing partnerships with rural areas and distance education across the system.

The paper also recognises the resources of both the private and public sector drivers as a means of deepening and transforming the entire post schooling system.

• Expand skills development

A system is envisaged that is made up of a diverse range of educational institutions that will expand considerably over the next 20 years. They will cater for the millions of people, especially the youth, and help to use education as a driver in fighting poverty and inequality. Minister Nzimande said there must be a clear link between schools, colleges, providers, universities and the world of work, as well as, a diversity of educational institutions in order to cope with the needs of a large and increasing student population.

Challenges

One of the critical challenges that the paper addresses, is the regulatory role of professional bodies. It says, ‘we must safeguard professional standards without being gatekeepers who restrict the supply of professionals’. The paper will further see the department uprooting short courses that are high cost-driven, but do not lead to any meaningful qualification, and often do not lead to any work placement.

Milestone in the history of education

Assessment College and City & Guilds support the White Paper and see it as a historic event in South Africa’s post school education system.

 

January 2014: Why investing in skills development for older workers makes economic sense

Why investing in skills development for older workers makes economic sense.

The Employment Tax Incentive Act came into effect in January 2014. The Act 
proposes a youth wage subsidy aimed at paving the way for on-the-job training.
Problems that youth face in finding jobs
Approximately half of South Africa’s youth are unemployed. The biggest problems 
facing youth employment are that they lack the skills to become employed and, that 
they lack experience in the workplace. The paper reported that employers view 
inexperienced skilled workers as a liability, and further, education is not a 
replacement for experience.
The Employment Tax Incentive Act aims to reduce the financial cost on employers 
hiring youths and therefore proposes to make the training of those employees more 
affordable. The Employment Tax Incentive Act encourages job seekers to become 
more active in their job search. 
The Youth Wage Subsidy 
The Youth Wage Subsidy aims to improve employment prospects for youth. It seeks
to reduce the cost and risk of hiring a young and inexperienced workforce and aims
to provide on-the-job experience and stimulate a demand for labour. 
The government hopes that this Act will promote employment for young people and 
create jobs in special economic zones once this legislation, which aims to provide for
them, has been promulgated. In terms of The Act, employers will receive a tax 
incentive to employ young workers for a maximum of two years under certain 
conditions.
On-the-job experience is crucial for attaining the appropriate skills, as well as for 
future employment prospects. Government is committed to work with the private 
sector to enhance employment opportunities and skills development for all workers, 
especially for the youth with limited work experience.
Who does the Employment Tax Incentive apply to?
The scheme is available to employers who employ South Africans citizens and 
asylum seekers with valid permits aged between 18 and 29. There are however a 
few exclusions which include:
• Government departments;
• Municipalities;
• Public entities; and
• Employers not registered for PAYE.
Employers can also not claim in respect of following employees:
• Employees employed before 1 October 2013;
• Domestic workers;
• Connected persons (employees related to the employer); and
• If the employee is paid less than the minimum wage applicable to the 
employer.
What can employers claim?
Employers may claim 50% of an employee’s remuneration if the employee earns 
less than R 2 000 (if the remuneration is not subject to any minimum wage 
provisions). In respect of employees earning between R 2 001 and R 4 000 an 
1amount of R 1 000 can be claimed. For employees earning between R 4 001 and R 
6000 a sliding formula will be used.
Employers can claim the incentive in respect of qualifying employees for a period of 
two years. The value of the incentive however halves in the employee’s second year 
of employment. The incentive falls away on the commencement of the employee’s 
third year of employment.
How to claim Employment Tax Incentive 
South African Revenue Service (SARS) will publish further details on how the 
incentive will work and how to claim. Checks and balances had been put in place to 
ensure the incentive will not lead to discrimination against older workers.
How can Assessment College help you to get the full benefit from the 
Employment Tax Incentive? 
Assessment College offer the following accredited courses that will benefit your 
company in implementing the Employment Tax Incentive.
• Coaching course
The youth that are employed will benefit by having a coach. A coach is a 
facilitator who coaches them to be competent performers in the workplace. 
This training programme focuses on the coaching process.
• Mentoring course
Mentoring in the workplace is a one-on-one relationship where the mentor 
shares knowledge and experience through interactive teaching with the 
mentee. This course shows how to apply the mentor model. Mentors will 
minimise the risk of hiring inexperienced workers.
• Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme
Soft skills are the ability to communicate effectively, promote teamwork within 
your organisation, present ideas, manage projects and people, solve 
problems and provide excellent customer care. They are critical to the 
success of the business. 
Our Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme will prepare 
the youth workers for employment.

Article by Heidi Agbenyo. 

Negative stereotypes about the capability of older workers held by employers are a major barrier to the provision of equal access to training. Common perceptions include older workers don’t want to learn, have difficulty adapting to new technology or struggle to adapt to change.

Other perceptions include a belief that investment in training older workers offers a poor return.

• older workers are interested in undertaking training and furthering their careers
• older workers can use their experience and skills to offset any decline in performance due to ageing
• when learning programmes are tailored to the age, knowledge and experience of older workers, learning is just as effective as and no more expensive than for younger workers.

However, a report from The Business, Work and Ageing Centre for Research, Australia, makes it clear that:

By 2020 those aged 50 and over will make up a third of the UK’s workforce. The trend, driven by demographic changes and the increasing propensity of older workers to work through and beyond the official retirement age, underlines the increasing importance of older workers to the UK economy. The need to maximise the use of older talent has never been more pressing and skills development has a key role to play, enabling older people to work  both effectively and productively and participate in the labour market for longer. International studies clearly show that the training and development of older workers helps to reduce skills mismatches, increases retention and productivity.

The City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development (CSD) report, Older Learners in the Workplace (2010), examines the provision of training for older workers in the UK and internationally. It reveals a complex picture of training participation for older learners. It found that despite the differences in content, quality and amount of training offered to older people across employment sectors, older workers are less likely to have access to training and development than younger workers – and less likely to engage with learning if the opportunities are available to them. Why is this case when supporting the skills development of older workers holds long term benefits for employers and society alike? B&Q, the largest home improvement and garden centre retailer in the UK, has recognised the benefits of recruiting over 50’s. In 1990 it launched a pioneering age diversity programme in its Macclesfield store. They found the benefits included a reduced turnover of staff, improved customer service and high levels of commitment. So what measures can other employers take to improve access to and the take up of training by older workers? CSD’s report offers some practical advice for employers.

Key actions highlighted include:

• Ensure age stereotypes within the organisation are addressed. This could take the form of audits to ensure older workers are being treated similarly to younger workers and have the same access to training opportunities.

• Consider targeting learning programmes at older workers and work with individuals to ensure that age related barriers to learning are addressed.

• Consider good practice in training for all learners. This should include training in job specific skills as well as general employability skills and the promotion of a culture of continual learning throughout the organisation. Employers should also work closely with practitioner to ensure the needs of older  learners are considered in training design.

Change is needed in employer attitudes towards training older people. Encouraging employers to provide appropriate training support for older workers throughout their careers is essential to improve access to and take up of training by older workers. However, CSD’s report makes it clear these changes must be accompanied by both changes to policy and practice.

January 2014: Employment Tax Incentive Act

Employment Tax Incentive Act

The Employment Tax Incentive Act came into effect in January 2014. The Act 
proposes a youth wage subsidy aimed at paving the way for on-the-job training.
Problems that youth face in finding jobs
Approximately half of South Africa’s youth are unemployed. The biggest problems 
facing youth employment are that they lack the skills to become employed and, that 
they lack experience in the workplace. The paper reported that employers view 
inexperienced skilled workers as a liability, and further, education is not a 
replacement for experience.
The Employment Tax Incentive Act aims to reduce the financial cost on employers 
hiring youths and therefore proposes to make the training of those employees more 
affordable. The Employment Tax Incentive Act encourages job seekers to become 
more active in their job search. 
The Youth Wage Subsidy 
The Youth Wage Subsidy aims to improve employment prospects for youth. It seeks
to reduce the cost and risk of hiring a young and inexperienced workforce and aims
to provide on-the-job experience and stimulate a demand for labour. 
The government hopes that this Act will promote employment for young people and 
create jobs in special economic zones once this legislation, which aims to provide for
them, has been promulgated. In terms of The Act, employers will receive a tax 
incentive to employ young workers for a maximum of two years under certain 
conditions.
On-the-job experience is crucial for attaining the appropriate skills, as well as for 
future employment prospects. Government is committed to work with the private 
sector to enhance employment opportunities and skills development for all workers, 
especially for the youth with limited work experience.
Who does the Employment Tax Incentive apply to?
The scheme is available to employers who employ South Africans citizens and 
asylum seekers with valid permits aged between 18 and 29. There are however a 
few exclusions which include:
• Government departments;
• Municipalities;
• Public entities; and
• Employers not registered for PAYE.
Employers can also not claim in respect of following employees:
• Employees employed before 1 October 2013;
• Domestic workers;
• Connected persons (employees related to the employer); and
• If the employee is paid less than the minimum wage applicable to the 
employer.
What can employers claim?
Employers may claim 50% of an employee’s remuneration if the employee earns 
less than R 2 000 (if the remuneration is not subject to any minimum wage 
provisions). In respect of employees earning between R 2 001 and R 4 000 an 
1amount of R 1 000 can be claimed. For employees earning between R 4 001 and R 
6000 a sliding formula will be used.
Employers can claim the incentive in respect of qualifying employees for a period of 
two years. The value of the incentive however halves in the employee’s second year 
of employment. The incentive falls away on the commencement of the employee’s 
third year of employment.
How to claim Employment Tax Incentive 
South African Revenue Service (SARS) will publish further details on how the 
incentive will work and how to claim. Checks and balances had been put in place to 
ensure the incentive will not lead to discrimination against older workers.
How can Assessment College help you to get the full benefit from the 
Employment Tax Incentive? 
Assessment College offer the following accredited courses that will benefit your 
company in implementing the Employment Tax Incentive.
• Coaching course
The youth that are employed will benefit by having a coach. A coach is a 
facilitator who coaches them to be competent performers in the workplace. 
This training programme focuses on the coaching process.
• Mentoring course
Mentoring in the workplace is a one-on-one relationship where the mentor 
shares knowledge and experience through interactive teaching with the 
mentee. This course shows how to apply the mentor model. Mentors will 
minimise the risk of hiring inexperienced workers.
• Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme
Soft skills are the ability to communicate effectively, promote teamwork within 
your organisation, present ideas, manage projects and people, solve 
problems and provide excellent customer care. They are critical to the 
success of the business. 
Our Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme will prepare 
the youth workers for employment.

The Employment Tax Incentive Act came into effect in January 2014. The Act proposes a youth wage subsidy aimed at paving the way for on-the-job training. 

Problems that youth face in finding jobs 

Approximately half of South Africa’s youth are unemployed. The biggest problems facing youth employment are that they lack the skills to become employed and, that they lack experience in the workplace. The paper reported that employers view inexperienced skilled workers as a liability, and further, education is not a replacement for experience.The Employment Tax Incentive Act aims to reduce the financial cost on employers hiring youths and therefore proposes to make the training of those employees more affordable. The Employment Tax Incentive Act encourages job seekers to become more active in their job search. 

 

The Youth Wage Subsidy 

The Youth Wage Subsidy aims to improve employment prospects for youth. It seeks to reduce the cost and risk of hiring a young and inexperienced workforce and aims to provide on-the-job experience and stimulate a demand for labour. The government hopes that this Act will promote employment for young people and create jobs in special economic zones once this legislation, which aims to provide for them, has been promulgated. In terms of The Act, employers will receive a tax incentive to employ young workers for a maximum of two years under certain conditions. On-the-job experience is crucial for attaining the appropriate skills, as well as for future employment prospects. Government is committed to work with the private sector to enhance employment opportunities and skills development for all workers, especially for the youth with limited work experience.

 

Who does the Employment Tax Incentive apply to?

The scheme is available to employers who employ South Africans citizens and asylum seekers with valid permits aged between 18 and 29. There are however a few exclusions which include:
• Government departments;
• Municipalities;
• Public entities; and
• Employers not registered for PAYE.

 

Employers can also not claim in respect of following employees:

• Employees employed before 1 October 2013;
• Domestic workers;
• Connected persons (employees related to the employer); and
• If the employee is paid less than the minimum wage applicable to the employer.

 

What can employers claim?

Employers may claim 50% of an employee’s remuneration if the employee earns less than R 2 000 (if the remuneration is not subject to any minimum wage provisions). In respect of employees earning between R 2 001 and R 4 000 an 1amount of R 1 000 can be claimed. For employees earning between R 4 001 and R 6000 a sliding formula will be used. Employers can claim the incentive in respect of qualifying employees for a period of two years. The value of the incentive however halves in the employee’s second year of employment. The incentive falls away on the commencement of the employee’s third year of employment.

 

How to claim Employment Tax Incentive 

South African Revenue Service (SARS) will publish further details on how the incentive will work and how to claim. Checks and balances had been put in place to ensure the incentive will not lead to discrimination against older workers.

 

How can Assessment College help you to get the full benefit from the Employment Tax Incentive? 

Assessment College offer the following accredited courses that will benefit your company in implementing the Employment Tax Incentive.

• Coaching course
The youth that are employed will benefit by having a coach. A coach is a facilitator who coaches them to be competent performers in the workplace. This training programme focuses on the coaching process.

• Mentoring course
Mentoring in the workplace is a one-on-one relationship where the mentor shares knowledge and experience through interactive teaching with the mentee. This course shows how to apply the mentor model. Mentors will minimise the risk of hiring inexperienced workers.

• Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme
Soft skills are the ability to communicate effectively, promote teamwork within your organisation, present ideas, manage projects and people, solve problems and provide excellent customer care. They are critical to the success of the business. Our Mastering soft skills for business success skills programme will prepare the youth workers for employment.

January 2014: Assessment College trains for the Jewellery Council of South Africa

Assessment College trains for the Jewellery Council of South Africa

Assessment College trains for the Jewellery Council

of South Africa

Assessment College, together with Comficor, were appointed by the Jewellery Council of South Africa during 2013 to train 41 future instructors in both Durban and Cape Town. The intensive programme included assessor, moderator, facilitator, coach and mentor training, as well as certain elements of the programme being adapted to suit the jewellery industry. 

Candidates travelled from around the country to attend the training, which was held over 24 days within a 10 week period. With immense time constraints, the hard work of the facilitators enabled the training to be successfully completed on time, finishing with eight sessions, five facilitators and lots of assessed portfolios. As the majority of the candidates were involved in different areas within the jewellery industry, the range of skills and expertise was very diverse, including public and private training providers, retailers, suppliers, employee representative organisations and managers. Unfilled seats were offered, at very short notice, to NGOs involved in beneficiation or jewellery design and related projects. 

The sessions involved lively interaction and debate with active learning being the focus. It is hoped that the training will have a significant impact on the ability of the industry to train new goldsmiths and setters, to roll out and formalise RPL and most importantly, to invigorate the industry

November 2013: Assessment College Licensee selected to represent South Africa

 

Assessment College Licensee selected to represent South Africa.

We are very proud of our licensees who are continuously contributing towards further developing our skills development and training industry. This includes Mirna de Hart, one of our prominent licensees who recently was one of three South African selected  to attend, as well as present, at the 5th study tour for African Cooperative Leaders to Japan, which was organised by the Japanese Consumer Cooperative Union (JCCU) and the International Labour Organisation (ILO) (Japan and Geneva).


The tour included various tours to experience the Japanese co-operative movement first hand.  Mirna recounted that the days were intense with lectures and site visits to re-enforce the importance of governance, practical application of the seven cooperative principles, challenges and opportunities faced by the various cooperative types and of course, experiencing the Japanese cuisine first hand.  During visits to the various industries including agricultural, workers, finance, consumer, insurance, hospital and welfare cooperatives, participants had a chance to be exposed to various forms of cooperatives which might not already form part of any current frame of reference. 


As part of the tour, selected participants, including Mirna, presented on their own local cooperative activities at a public seminar.  The seminar audience included cooperative stakeholders from Japan, as well as Her Excellency the South African Ambassador and delegates from the Embassy of Tanzania and Zanzibar.  Assessment College is very proud of Mirna’s achievement and is looking forward to seeing the results of her new-found international knowledge.

November 2013: Assessment College helps young people find employment

 Assessment College helps young people find employment.

As a global leader in skills education, Assessment College, which is part of the City & Guilds Group has been helping people get into a job, progress in their career, and move onto the next challenge since 1878.

Assessment College and iSeleSele Property Academy have embraced this ethos and employed and mentored several young learners through the years, of which we are extremely proud of.

Mbali Kandawire, started on a Fasset-sponsored Learnership where she completed a National Diploma in Accounting (AAT). Part of this Learnership involved Mbali working in permanent employment on completion of her Learnership. Mbali started her work-placed training in the iSeleSele Property Academy department at City & Guilds as a workshop Coordinator.  Being a driven young lady she not only excelled at her work, but also completed her Internal Auditing degree through UNISA (University of South Africa – distance education).

Jacques Harmse, General Manager of iSeleSele Property Academy, commented, ‘we shared in Mbali’s joy when she achieved her degree, but knew that she would spread her wings and that her time with us was only a stepping stone on the pathway she was to follow.' In June 2013 Mbali left City & Guilds for a position as an Internal Auditor with the Mpumalanga Government.

However, not all our young employees leave, sometimes their growth can be within the company.  Jacque Joko, also from the Ithemba Learnership, started in the     iSeleSele Property Academy department of City & Guilds as an Office Assistant. Through her hard work and demonstration of analytical skills, she was then transferred to the Group Finance Department where she continues to excel.

Following the success of Mbali and Jacque, two more Ithemba learners have since been employed by City & Guilds and continue to work with us and grow. Jacques Harmse reflects 'being in a field where education is key, we support and encourage the growth of young people in their chosen careers. We are a company  who believes in encouraging our managers who have the power to change the future of young people, and we sincerely hope that the example we set will be followed by  many more.'

November 2013: Assessment College expands into Tanzania

Assessment College expands into Tanzania.

We are rapidly expanding our services around the world, from Botswana to Malaysia to Nigeria, and more recently to Tanzania. Assessment College has just completed a training contract for the Voluntary Service Overseas (VSO) in Mtwara, Tanzania.

Assessment College Licensee Herman de Vries is just back from Tanzania where he presented two programmes to 32 teachers in total from the vocational training centres in the cities of Mtwara and Lindi.  These teachers represented a wide variety of trades, each with approximately seven years’ teaching experience at the vocational centres in Tanzania.

The two programmes that were presented, the Advanced Diploma in Teaching, Training and Evaluating Learning and  the Skills Programme in Assessing Competence, form part  of a greater training programme that City & Guilds is currently offering, which is sponsored by the VSO.  The purpose of the overall programme is to bring people together to share skills, build capabilities, promote international understanding and action, as well as to change lives and therefore make the world a fairer place for all.

Following his return, Herman reported that the training contract had been a success. He said 'the training has been stimulating and it has been a pleasure and inspiration to be able to facilitate educators who were waiting and willing to apply the methods shown in their own classrooms and workshops as soon as they could'.
Assessment College hopes to further expand their global presence and deliver such training programmes in many more countries around the world.

 

March 2012: Assessment College and City & Guilds entering a new era together!

It is with great pleasure that we announce that, after 13 years in operation, a bulk of the shares in Assessment College have been bought by City & Guilds. City & Guilds have taken over control of the group from 1 March 2012.

City & Guilds holds to the same quality and ethical standards as Assessment College and is as committed to superior customer service and sound corporate governance as Assessment College has always been. It is a reputable, international organisation that will bring many more opportunities to Assessment College and all of its stakeholders. City & Guilds has become the global benchmark for skills development, being the UK’s leading awarding body, offering more than 500 qualifications across 28 industry sectors, through 8500 approved learning providers. City & Guilds impressively has over 130 years experience in the field.

Assessment College feels itself privileged to be part of the City & Guilds group. Please be assured that, at Assessment College, it is business as usual and we are still 100% committed to servicing our customers at the high quality you are accustomed to. Marietta Van Rooyen will no longer be involved in the business but will continue to participate in the education sector generally. I will remain MD of the business and our black empowerment partners, Liberty Lane Trading, will remain as shareholders together with City & Guilds.

Please feel free to contact me should any further information be required. Assessment College and City & Guilds are looking forward to a long and mutually beneficial relationship with you.

Best regards

Gerda Magnus

Managing Director, Assessment College